The territory of Villamagna is distinctive both for its climate and its geology.
It's located nearly at midpoint between the Adriatic Sea and mount Majella (the highest peak in the Apennines after the Gran Sasso).
The soil composition across the territory is diverse and includes sand, clay, and gravel.
Not surprisingly, Villamagna is renowned for its Montepulciano grapes, and vine-growing has always held great importance in the local economy.
The wines from Villamagna are so distinctive that they have earned the specific denomination “Villamagna D.O.C.”

Villamagna is a small town with very ancient origins.
The earliest archaeological traces date back to the VII-VI century B.C. Villamagna has been renowned for its fertile soil since Roman times, as the name itself suggests (“great farmstead” in Latin).
In 870 the Benedictine monks added Villamagna to the Papal States, and developed agriculture and commerce in the surrounding areas. During the following centuries, the medieval village first became State property under the Kingdom of Sicily, then feudal manor until 1806.
Part of the town was severely damaged by bombing during World War II, but many historic landmarks have been preserved to this day.

The territory of Villamagna is distinctive both for its climate and its geology.
It's located nearly at midpoint between the Adriatic Sea and mount Majella (the highest peak in the Apennines after the Gran Sasso).
The soil composition across the territory is diverse and includes sand, clay, and gravel.
Not surprisingly, Villamagna is renowned for its Montepulciano grapes, and vine-growing has always held great importance in the local economy.
The wines from Villamagna are so distinctive that they have earned the specific denomination “Villamagna D.O.C.”

Villamagna is a small town with very ancient origins.
The earliest archaeological traces date back to the VII-VI century B.C. Villamagna has been renowned for its fertile soil since Roman times, as the name itself suggests (“great farmstead” in Latin).
In 870 the Benedictine monks added Villamagna to the Papal States, and developed agriculture and commerce in the surrounding areas. During the following centuries, the medieval village first became State property under the Kingdom of Sicily, then feudal manor until 1806.
Part of the town was severely damaged by bombing during World War II, but many historic landmarks have been preserved to this day.